Sudbury Curling Club Inc

Administrative Policies and Guidelines

KITCHEN SECTION

 

K01     Health Unit Inspections

It is imperative that the kitchen and bar area function in such a manner as to ensure compliance with all health and safety regulations and guidelines.

Health inspectors will conduct unannounced sporadic inspections of the kitchen and bar facilities and therefore it is imperative that those areas are always maintained in an uncluttered and good state of cleanliness.

 

K02     Kitchen Access

 

Only authorized personnel shall be allowed in the kitchen area.  Authorized personnel could be the head cook, casual employees hired to assist in the kitchen and volunteers who are assigned to help in the kitchen for various events.

Bar staff may have access to the kitchen to perform specific tasks related to bar duties i.e.: using the dishwasher, preparing garnishes for drinks, store and retrieve ice etc...

Staff may have access to the kitchen and use of the microwave, toaster and refrigerator for the purposes of storing and preparing personal meals.  Staff will not be allowed to use the fryers, the oven or stove top for any personal use.

 

K03     Staff & Volunteers and Food Services

During open kitchen hours, employees and volunteers (while on duty) may purchase meals off the “a la carte” menu and be entitled to a 50% discount off the menu price.

Employees and volunteers may (at the discretion of the head cook) be allowed to consume “left over” food items from the buffet provided the event participants have confirmed they are all done and only after all of the food has been moved from the buffet area into the kitchen.

Staff and volunteers are not allowed to consume any food items either left over from an event or from food stock in the pantry or refrigerator without first obtaining permission from the head cook.

 

K04     Food Handling & Safety

 

Staff and volunteers who assist in food preparation will be required to wear appropriate hair restraint in compliance with health & food safety requirements.

Staff and volunteers who assist in the serving of food (not directly dealing with food preparation) shall not be required to wear hair restraint.

Staff and volunteers involved in food preparation must frequently wash their hands and ensure they work with properly cleaned cookware, dishes, and utensils and on sanitized surfaces.

Should kitchen employees or volunteers touch non-sanitized surfaces such as the cash register, bar fridge, door handles etc... they must ensure that they thoroughly wash their hands prior to handling food or cooking utensils.

Food Storage

The head cook is responsible to ensure that foods that must be refrigerated are kept at the appropriate temperature as per Health Department requirements. Regularly checking the fridge thermometers is essential to ensure compliance.

Cooked foods stored in the refrigerators must be stored in appropriate containers. The containers must properly identify the contents and the date of preparation.

Foods stored in original containers that display an expiration date must be reviewed regularly and be discarded once expiration date has passed.

All items stored in the refrigerator must be well covered and/or sealed.

Raw meat must be carefully wrapped and cannot be stored in close proximity to cooked meats.

Safe storage of food will help prevent the spread and growth of harmful bacteria.

 

Refer to Sudbury & District Health Unit Food Safety regulations and guidelines attached hereto

Food Storage

Dry Goods Storage

(For food that does not require refrigeration, e.g.: flour, sugar, cereals, canned goods)

Storage rooms must protect the dry goods from freezing, excessive heat, dampness, insects and rodents.

  • storage temperatures should be between 50° and 70° F (10° and 21° C).
  • shelving should be constructed of material which can be quickly cleaned.
  • store bulk foods in clean vermin-proof containers.
  • practice proper stock rotation.
  • clean spills immediately.

Refrigerator Storage

  • Provide adequate refrigeration space for all hazardous foods.
  • Provide adequate refrigeration space for thawing frozen hazardous foods.
  • Refrigerator walls, floor and shelves should be constructed of rust-free and impervious material which can be easily cleaned.
  • Provide an easy, readable, accurate, indicating thermometer in the warmest part of the refrigerator.
  • Refrigerator temperatures must be maintained at 4° C or 40° F or less.
  • Store raw food separate from cooked food to prevent cross contamination.
  • Store cooked foods on top shelves.
  • Keep all foods covered.
  • Keep food off the floor and away from the walls to allow for cleaning and proper air circulation in walk-in coolers.

Freezer Storage

  • Freezer walls, floors and shelving should be constructed of rust-free and non-absorbent material.
  • Proper freezer temperature is –18° C (0° F) or less.
  • Provide an accurate indicating thermometer and place in the warmest section of the freezer.
  • Keep all foods covered.
  • Practice proper stock rotation.

 

Food Safety and Leftovers

Leftovers need to be properly handled. Here are some basic food safety tips to help keep leftovers safe.

 

Handling leftovers

Before and after handling leftovers, wash your hands with hot soapy water, as well as all utensils, dishes and work surfaces.

For added protection, you may want to sanitize utensils, dishes and work surfaces. Normal household sanitizers or a mild bleach solution (5 ml/1 tsp. bleach per 750 ml/3 cups water) may be used

Keep foods out of the danger zone, between 4°C (40°F) and 60°C (140°F) to prevent the growth of harmful bacteria.

Throw away any cooked food left out at room temperature for more than two hours.

Never rely on your nose, eyes or taste buds to judge the safety of food. You cannot tell if food has been contaminated by its look, smell or taste.

When in doubt, throw it out!
Cooling leftovers
Refrigerate all leftovers promptly in uncovered, shallow containers so they cool quickly.
Very hot items can first be cooled at room temperature. Refrigerate once steaming stops.
Leave the lid off or wrap loosely until the food is cooled to refrigeration temperature.
Avoid overstocking the refrigerator to allow cool air to circulate freely.

Storing leftovers

Always use a clean container to hold the leftovers, or wrap the leftovers in leak-proof plastic bags to prevent cross-contamination. Keep different types of leftovers separate.
Eat refrigerated leftovers within 2 to 3 days, or freeze them for later use.
Date leftovers to help identify the contents and to ensure they are not stored too long.

Food Safety and Leftovers

Defrosting leftovers

Thaw frozen leftovers in the refrigerator or in the microwave. Ensure food is properly sealed.
Consume or cook the leftovers immediately after they have thawed.

Refrigerator

Place the container or platter on the bottom shelf of the refrigerator to avoid leakage on other foods during thawing.

Microwave

Before defrosting, remove food from any packaging or containers not identified as microwave-safe (such as plastic wrap, freezer cartons, and Styrofoam trays). Only use containers and wraps that are labeled as microwave safe.
Use the defrost setting of your microwave and make sure leftovers are completely defrosted before reheating.
Use or eat the leftovers immediately after defrosting. Don't re-freeze foods that you've defrosted in the microwave.

Reheating leftovers

Always reheat leftovers to a safe internal temperature of 74ºC (165ºF).
Use a digital food thermometer to check the temperature.
Bring gravies, soups and sauces to a full, rolling boil and stir during the process.
Discard uneaten leftovers after they have been reheated.

Reheating in a microwave

Use only containers and plastic wrap designed for use in the microwave.
Loosen the lid or wrap to allow steam to escape.
Stop the microwave midway through reheating and stir the food so that the heat is evenly distributed.
Rotate the plate several times during cooking if your microwave does not have a rotating tray.

 

Health risks

Some people can get food borne illness, also known as "food poisoning", and not even know they have it. Food poisoning is caused by eating foods that are contaminated.

Symptoms can include: vomiting, nausea, stomach cramps, diarrhea, headache, constipation

These symptoms can start suddenly, several hours or even days after you eat contaminated food. Most people recover completely from food borne illness, but on rare occasions some people may suffer more serious effects. The groups at higher risk for serious health effects include pregnant women, children under the age of 5, adults over the age of 60, and people with weakened immune systems. You should see a health care professional and contact your local public health unit as soon as possible if you think you have a food borne illness and persistent fever.

Chilling

It is extremely important to keep cold food cold and hot food hot, so that your food never reaches the "temperature danger zone". This is where bacteria can grow quickly and cause food related illness.
Keep your raw meat, poultry, fish and seafood cold. Refrigerate or freeze them as soon as you get home from the grocery store.
Refrigerate fresh fruits and vegetables that need refrigeration when you get home. This includes all pre-cut and ready-to-eat produce.
Make sure your refrigerator is set at 4 °C (40 °F) or lower and your freezer at -18 °C (0 °F) or lower. This will keep your food out of the temperature danger zone between 4 °C (40 °F) to 60 °C (140 °F) where bacteria can grow quickly.
Keep your raw meat, poultry, fish and seafood separate from other food in the refrigerator at home. Do this by storing them in different containers.
Place raw meat, poultry, fish and seafood in sealed containers or plastic bags on the bottom shelf of your refrigerator so raw juices won't drip onto other food

Fridge and freezer storage

The following recommended refrigeration times are for safety, and the freezing times are for quality. If you store properly wrapped food in your freezer the quality may be maintained for longer periods of time.

Food - Fresh

Refrigerator

4 °C (40 °F) or lower

 Freezer

18 °C (0 °F) or lower

Fresh meat

Beef

2-4 days

10 - 12 months

Pork

2-4 days

8 - 12 months

Lamb

2-4 days

8 - 12 months

Veal

3-4 days

8 - 12 months

Ground meat

1-2 days

2 - 3 months

 Fresh poultry

Chicken/Turkey - whole

2-3 days

1 year

Chicken/Turkey - pieces

2-3 days

6 months

 Fresh fish

Lean fish - cod, flounder etc.

3-4 days

6 months

Fatty fish - salmon etc.

3-4 days

2 months

Shellfish - clams, crab, lobster

12-24 hours

2-4 months

Scallops, shrimp, cooked shellfish

1-2 days

2-4 months

 Ham

Canned ham

6-9 months

Don't freeze

Cooked ham

3-4 days

2-3 months

 Bacon and sausages

Bacon

1 week

1 month

Raw sausage

1-2 days

1-2 months

Pre-cooked sausage links or patties

1 week

1-2 months

 Hot dogs

Un-opened hotdogs

2 weeks

1-2 months

Opened hotdogs

1 week

1-2 months

 Lunch meat and deli food                     

Un-opened lunch meat

2 weeks

1-2 months

Opened lunch meat

3-5 days

1-2 months

Deli packaged lunch meat

3-4 days

2-3 months

Deli or homemade salads

3-5 days

Don't freeze

 Frozen dinners                         Keep frozen until ready to cook        3-4 months

Leftovers                                        Refrigerator                  Freezer

Cooked meat, stews, egg or

vegetable dishes

3-4 days

2-3 months

Cooked poultry and fish

3-4 days

4-6 months

Meat broth and gravy

3-4 days

4-6 months

Eggs

Fresh in shell

3-4 weeks

Don't freeze

Fresh out of shell

2-4 days

4 months

Hard-cooked

1 week

Doesn't freeze well

Egg substitutes un-opened

10 days

1 year

Egg substitutes opened

3 days

Don't freeze

 

Dairy products

Un-opened milk

Best before date

6 weeks

Opened milk

3 days

Don't freeze

Un-opened cottage cheese

Best before date

Doesn't freeze well

Opened cottage cheese

3 days

Don't freeze

Un-opened yogurt

Best before date

1-2 months

Opened yogurt

3 days

Don't freeze

Soft cheese

1 week

Doesn't freeze well

Semi-soft cheese

2-3 weeks

8 weeks

Firm cheese

5 weeks

3 months

Hard cheese

10 months

1 year

Processed cheese

5 months

3 months

Un-opened salted butter

8 weeks

1 year

Un-opened unsalted butter

8 weeks

3 months

Opened butter

3 weeks

Don't freeze

 

Vegetables

Beans green or waxed

5 days

8 months

Carrots & Celery

2 weeks

10-12 months

Leaf lettuce

3-7 days

Don't freeze

Iceberg lettuce

1-2 weeks

Don't freeze

Spinach

2-4 weeks

10-12 months

Squash

1 week

10-12 months

Tomatoes

Don't refrigerate

2 months

 

Cleaning

Cleaning your hands, kitchen surfaces and utensils, fruit and vegetables and reusable grocery bags will help eliminate bacteria and reduce the risk of food related illness. Wash your hands with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds. Use one cutting board for produce, and a separate one for raw meat, poultry, fish and seafood.

Use paper towels to wipe kitchen surfaces, or change dishcloths daily to avoid the risk of cross-contamination and the spread of bacteria. Avoid using sponges, as they are harder to keep bacteria-free.

Sanitize countertops, cutting boards and utensils (including the chip cutter) before and after preparing food. Use a kitchen sanitizer (following the directions on the container) or a bleach solution (5 ml household bleach to 750 ml of water), and rinse with water.

More tips - Did you know?

Color does not always tell you if your food is safe to eat. Always follow internal cooking temperatures to be safe! Cleaning your hands, kitchen surfaces, and utensils will help eliminate bacteria and reduce the risk of food poisoning. Clean your digital food thermometer in warm, soapy water between every temperature reading to avoid spreading bacteria.

Wash your hands with soap and warm water for at least 15 seconds. An alcohol-based hand rub can be used if soap and water are not available. You should always wash your hands before and after you touch raw meat, poultry, fish, and seafood, and after using the washroom, handling pets or changing diapers. If you've used a plate or utensils to handle raw food, don't use them again until you've washed them thoroughly in the dishwasher or in warm, soapy water.

Use one cutting board for produce and a separate one for raw meat, poultry, fish, and seafood.

Use paper towels to wipe kitchen surfaces, or change dishcloths daily to avoid the risk of cross-contamination and the spread of bacteria. Avoid using sponges, as they are harder to keep bacteria-free.

Sanitize countertops, cutting boards, and utensils before and after preparing food. Use a kitchen sanitizer (following the directions on the container) or a bleach solution (5 ml household bleach to 750 ml of water), and rinse with water.

It is important to keep cold food cold and hot food hot so that the food never reaches the "temperature danger zone" where bacteria can grow quickly and cause food poisoning.

Remember to follow safe food handling practices when you shop for, separate, clean, chill, store, and cook foods.

 

Upcoming Events

26 Dec 2020;
10:00AM - 04:00PM
Boxing Day Family Spiel